strategy+business is published by PwC Strategy& Inc.
 
or, sign in with:
strategy and business

strategy+business (Third Quarter 2000)

Below is a full article list from this issue of strategy+business.

Europe's B2B Benefit
By Simon Caulkin
 
Globlization Is No Fait Accompli
By John Micklethwait and Adrian Wooldridge
 
Online Exchanges: The Death of Innovation?
By C.V. Ramachandran
 
The Promise in Digital Branding
By Horacio Rozanski
 
The Third World Goes to Market
By Stephan-Götz Richter
 
Your Pirates Are Your Customers
By Allen Weiss
 
Steal This Idea!
By Jan Torsilieri and Chuck Lucier
Knowledge remains the strongest force for business-building — if you're willing to link it to the bottom line and borrow inspiration from everywhere.
 
Revisiting Reengineering
By Art Kleiner
Heralded as the corporation's savior, BPR was later condemned as a heartless, failed management fad. But perhaps evangelists like Michael Hammer needed to go even farther.
 
Is Genius Enough?
By Harold Evans
Britian had it all — brains, ideas, and inventions like radar and pencillin — but the U.S. brought the best to the market. The lesson is sobering: Native brilliance needs a national backup drive.
 
The Last Mile to Nowhere: Flaws & Fallacies in Internet Home-Delivery Schemes
By Tim Laseter
Investors have risked billions on Webvan, Urbanfetch, and other same-day transporters. The economics, though, show they won't deliver for long.
 
Privacy War: The Europe-U.S.Struggle Over Consumer Data
By Jeffrey Rothfeder
In the E.U., your secrets are sacred. In the U.S., they are for sale. For global marketers, that means trouble.
 
From Bricks to Clicks: The Four Stages of E-volution
By Jill Albrinck, Gil Irwin, Gary Neilson, Dianna Sasina
While most U.S. companies have passed through their digital infancy, time is running out for critical decisions on mission, leadership, processes, structure, and talent.
 
From Bricks to Clicks: The Four Stages of E-Volution (Resources)
 
Pattie Maes and Her Agents Provocateurs
By Glenn Rifkin
Artificial intelligence research used to focus on teaching machines to think. Until a Belgian MIT professor taught them to shop.
 
The People Factor in Post-Merger Integration
By Victoria Griffith
Fred Hassan's human touch transformed Pharmacia & Upjohn from hostile tribes into a growing global concern.
 
John Quelch: The Thought Leader Interview
By Randall Rothenberg
It's no longer enough to act local, says London Business School dean and global marketing guru John Quelch. Coke, P & G, and Unilever now must learn to think local, too.
 
China, Branding, and Other Studies of Value
By Martin Morse Wooster
China, branding, antitrust, layoffs, globalization, and inflation.
 
The Days of Futurists Past
By Stuart Crainer
Projecting the future used to be a bold, adventurous enterprise. Today's business seers — John Naisbitt, Watts Wacker, et al. — are doing all they can to keep up with the present.
 
[I LOVE YOU, NOT]
by Bruce Feirstein