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Published: August 29, 2007

 
 

The Productivity Promisers

In this regard, the issue of productivity will always be a personal one. These resources provide an excellent set of ways to consider both the substance and the context of how you think about and organize your work. It’s easy to see GTD as the end of a long and winding road to paramount productivity, but this system, too, will come to its natural limits. Productivity principles will always evolve, while retaining fundamental roots. And so, always be mindful that although the experts can tell you how to do things more effectively, the question of what, exactly, you should be doing must always be yours and yours alone.

Reprint No. 07311

Author Profile:


Tom Ehrenfeld (tomehrenfeld@comcast.net) is a freelance writer based in Cambridge, Mass. Formerly a writer and editor with Harvard Business Review and Inc. magazine, he is the author of The Startup Garden: How Growing a Business Grows You (McGraw-Hill, 2001).
 
 
 
 
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Personal Productivity Resources
Works mentioned in this review.

  1. Eric Abrahamson and David H. Freedman, A Perfect Mess: The Hidden Benefits of Disorder: How Crammed Closets, Cluttered Offices, and On-the-Fly Planning Make the World a Better Place (Little, Brown, 2006), 328 pages
  2. David Allen, Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity (Viking, 2001), 282 pages
  3. Stephen R. Covey, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People: Powerful Lessons in Personal Change (1989; Free Press, 2004), 384 pages
  4. Peter F. Drucker, The Effective Executive: The Definitive Guide to Getting the Right Things Done (1967; HarperCollins, 2006), 208 pages
  5. Henry Ford, Today and Tomorrow (1926; Productivity Press, 1988), 300 pages
  6. Brian Tracy, Time Power: A Proven System for Getting More Done in Less Time Than You Ever Thought Possible (AMACOM, 2004), 302 pages
  7. www.lifehacker.com
 
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