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Published: December 23, 2011

 
 

The Jobs Engine

• Public school superintendents and university presidents need to think beyond core curricula and their graduation rates. Students don’t want to merely graduate; they want an education that results in a good job.

• Military leaders must consider good jobs when waging war and planning for peace. They must ask themselves whether military strikes, occupations, or community policing will be followed by a growing economy with good jobs — or not. The opportunity to have a good job is essential to changing a population’s desperate and violent frame of mind.

Mayors and leaders of every city, town, and village on Earth must realize that every decision they make should consider the impact, first and foremost, on good jobs.

The evolution of the great global dream is going to be the material for hundreds of Ph.D. dissertations. But it’s only the beginning of the story. Shifting the importance humans place on peace, love, food, and shelter — all the things people used to care about more than anything — to a good job suggests a significant change in the evolution of civilization. One of the most important changes is in global migration patterns.

Man and woman probably appeared about 200,000 years ago on the savannah plains in what is now Ethiopia. They fanned out to improve their lives, their tribes, and their families. And they have never stopped walking. The first to move have always been the boldest adventurers, explorers, and wanderers, and that’s still true. Until rather recently in human evolution, explorers were looking for new hunting grounds, cropland, territories, passageways, and natural resources. But now, the explorers are seeking something else.

Today’s explorers migrate to the cities that are most likely to maximize innovation and entrepreneurial talents and skill. Wherever the most talented choose to migrate is where the next economic empires will rise. That’s why San Francisco, Seoul, and Singapore have become such colossal engines of job creation. When the talented explorers of the new millennium choose your city, you attain the new Holy Grail of global leadership — brain gain, talent gain, and subsequently, job creation.

— Jim Clifton

Reprinted with permission from The Coming Jobs War: What Every Leader Must Know about the Future of Job Creation, by Jim Clifton (Gallup Press, 2011).

 
 
 
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This Reviewer

  1. Carl J. Schramm is the former president and CEO of the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, the largest private funder of firm formation and growth research, and a Batten Fellow at the University of Virginia. His recent books include Good Capitalism, Bad Capitalism, and the Economics of Growth and Prosperity (with William J. Baumol and Robert E. Litan; Yale University Press, 2007), and The Entrepreneurial Imperative: How America’s Economic Miracle Will Reshape the World (and Change Your Life) (HarperBusiness, 2006).

This Excerpt

  1. The Coming Jobs War: What Every Leader Must Know about the Future of Job Creation (Gallup Press, 2011), by Jim Clifton
  2. Jim Clifton is chairman and CEO of Gallup Inc., a leading research firm that collects public opinion in 150 countries, and creator of the Gallup Path, a metric-based economic model used in more than 500 companies worldwide. He is chairman of the Thurgood Marshall College Fund. The Coming Jobs War is his first book.