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strategy+business: Corporate Strategies and News Articles on Global Business, Management, Competition and Marketing

Issue 80, Autumn 2015

In this issue

Cover story

  • Strategy & Leadership

    Grow from Your Strengths

    by Gerald Adolph and Kim David Greenwood
    The only sustainable way to capture new opportunities is to remain true to what your company does best.

Features

  • Strategy & Leadership

    Deals That Win

    by J. Neely, John Jullens, and Joerg Krings
    Twelve years of data shows that mergers and acquisitions that apply or enhance capabilities produce superior returns.
  • Organizations & People

    Beyond Bias

    by Heidi Grant Halvorson and David Rock
    Neuroscience research shows how new organizational practices can shift ingrained thinking.

Leading Ideas

Essays

  • Organizations & People

    20/20 Foresight

    by Ram Charan
    Many business leaders need to improve their perceptual acuity. Here’s how you can develop the ability to look around corners — and become a catalyst for change.
  • Healthcare

    Staking Your Claim in the Healthcare Gold Rush

    by Carl Dumont, Sundar Subramanian, and Christoph Dankert
    Revolutionary changes in the delivery, financing, and management of healthcare present a choice: Do you want to be a gold miner or a bartender?

Books in Brief

  • The Race Goes to the Bold

    by Allison Schrager
    Thriving amid rapid change, authors Peter Diamandis and Steven Kotler argue, requires a fearlessness that borders on hubris.
  • The Wright Stuff

    by Theodore Kinni
    In a new biography of the brothers who invented the airplane, David McCullough describes the frustrations and triumphs involved in getting aviation off the ground.
  • The Prescriptions of Dr. Sachs

    by David K. Hurst
    The eminent — and controversial — economist offers a set of cures for the ills of global poverty. It’s not clear the medicine works.
  • It’s Getting Hot in Here

    by Katie Fehrenbacher
    Addressing climate change with a sense of urgency isn’t a matter of morality, two economists argue. It’s about managing risk.

Recent Research